We love bicycling as a lifestyle, culture, and sport. We love to ride, build, restore, oggle and sometimes race bicycles. We also love to talk on at great length about our ideas, opinions and exploits involving all of the above. Welcome to our BLOG!

Abandon Your Car is not a slogan or ideology so much as a reminder to all of us to get away from our petro-mobiles as often as we possibly can and embark on life as an adventure by bicycle.

We'll keep you current on the important road and trail beta from our home base in Palisade, Colorado and shower you with our .02 cents about the ongoings of bicycle tribes the world over.

Be sure to tune in for Danny, AKA: the Young Apprenctice, providing the ever important perspectives of a college-bound bike geek and all around brainiac in his NORCAL Updates.

We're glad you're here- look around, drop the Bike Master a line and then get out and ride for awhile- you'll be glad you did!





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Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Fruita, USA Trail report for December 7-8, 2010




That's right folks- DECEMBER 7th and 8th and the riding is mighty in Mucha Fruita!

The singletrack is pristine- frozen up in spots, perfectly tacky and quiet. As Dave pointed out in his last post, the road over the Monument is closed to cars, but open to bicycles until the snow flies. What a bonus for the roadies! Longstory short, we are loving life on 2 wheels in the Grand Valley right now.


Tuesday afternoon at one of my favorite view spots- why I so often peel off Mary's onto Wrangler's. Wouldn't it be awesome if Wrangler's actually went somewhere?



What I love the most about riding the singletrack in late season is the how new it feels. The light is entirely different, the ground feels different, the air feels different. Every trail is new again- as they will be yet again come spring. But, unlike early season when the masses from the mountains migrate west, hopped up on cabin fever, desperate for spring and a chance to bust out their helmet cams, high fives and parking lot beer, late season riders have a quiet exuberance. In late season the trailheads and trails are eerily calm, riders greeting one another with sincere and knowing expressions of joy at getting another day on the bike and at encountering someone else all layered up and nutty enough to get out and do the same.


Get your woolies and shoe covers on and get out there- after all, any day now we could be relegated to rollers in the garage or, worse yet, the gym.


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